<div dir="ltr">Hello,<div><br></div><div>The idea Pis as thin clients rather than actual playout boxes isn&#39;t a bad one. Though I&#39;d be inclined to look at a vendor supported thin client option for a big station over Raspberry Pis. They come with the cost benefit but have been known to eat through SD cards and prove generally unreliable on occasion (we&#39;ve got a national fleet of them doing digital signage in studios where I work).</div><div><br></div><div>There&#39;s also split ads and whatnot to worry about in a big installation. I&#39;m not sure I&#39;d go with just one big box in the middle running all the audio, even if you usually rely on one SQL/file server (with a warm/cold backup).</div><div><br></div><div>Either way, splitting audio out from a thin client unit in the studios could be a winner. Especially if it costs less and proves more reliable than KVM extenders used in the installs I&#39;ve supported.</div><div><br></div><div>The one I&#39;ve been meaning to get the time (and licences) to play with is VMs in a fault tolerant environment using LiveWire or Rivenna. Potentially a bit overly complicated for a small service but the sort of thing you start thinking about with multiple splits and services.</div><div><br></div><div>Regards,</div><div><br></div><div>Marc.</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 2 July 2015 at 15:27, Brad Beahm <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:brad@kliqfm.com" target="_blank">brad@kliqfm.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr">The idea of running Rivendell on the Pi could be quite appealing for multi-station radio groups... under certain conditions.<div><br></div><div>If I had the time and money here&#39;s how I&#39;d do it.</div><div><br></div><div>BUILD A BIG BULLETPROOF SERVER-</div><div>Use server class hardware, redundant drives, lots of RAM and a big UPS to run the official Broadcast Appliance server version from Paravel.  That would hold the /var/snd audio and mySql database.  And I&#39;d put in the professional Audio Science audio card(s) into the server machine. (or if you&#39;ve got a AOIP plant the network audio drivers would be on that server machine). GPIO and Switcher cards could also go there for satellite uses.</div><div><br></div><div>The Pi&#39;s would then just connect to the server as individual hosts. They could be setup to use the Core Audio Engine on the server so their cheap audio isn&#39;t a problem. I think you&#39;d also be able to us the Pi&#39;s GPIO pins to control starts/tallys from equipment in the studio</div><div><br></div><div>I&#39;d mount the Pis behind the monitor in studio (could be touchscreens).  The only cables you&#39;d need to run would be the Ethernet, power, keyboard/mouse and any GPIO.  </div><div><br></div><div>It&#39;d be a lot more efficient to have a bunch of Raspberry Pis as thin clients to the server than to try and build out whole machines for each studio.  Keeping spares would be a lot easier too as you could keep fully configured Pis or just a few configured SD cards handy. A swap would only take a few minutes.</div><div><br></div><div>And at $40 you could put a Pi in about every office (Traffic, PD, Prod, Engineering) to allow logs, music, and spots to be imported conveniently.</div><div><br></div><div>The overall system cost could be pretty low compared to a similar system of that size from other automation vendors. (I&#39;m thinking of products like Enco1 <a href="http://www.enco.com/products/enco1.html" target="_blank">http://www.enco.com/products/enco1.html</a>)</div><span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><div><br></div><div>Brad</div></font></span><div><div class="h5"><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Jul 1, 2015 at 11:20 AM, Brian McKelvey <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:theturtle32@gmail.com" target="_blank">theturtle32@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">Sure can! The built in audio output is unbalanced and very, very noisy. Terrible, really.<br>
<br>
But I had no problems at all connecting a USB audio adapter and using that instead.  Even a $7 one from Amazon has a dramatically better noise floor than the built in audio.<br>
<br>
So yeah, basically any Linux-supported USB audio device should work fine.<br>
<br>
Brian<br>
<br>
Sent from my iPhone<br>
<div><div><br>
&gt; On Jul 1, 2015, at 4:46 AM, Rob Landry &lt;<a href="mailto:41001140@interpring.com" target="_blank">41001140@interpring.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; On Wed, 24 Jun 2015, Brian wrote:<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; Just thought I&#39;d share with you that I got Rivendell running flawlessly on a Raspberry Pi 2 Model B.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Can you get good quality audio out of it?<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Rob<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Rivendell-dev mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Rivendell-dev@lists.rivendellaudio.org" target="_blank">Rivendell-dev@lists.rivendellaudio.org</a><br>
<a href="http://caspian.paravelsystems.com/mailman/listinfo/rivendell-dev" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://caspian.paravelsystems.com/mailman/listinfo/rivendell-dev</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div></div></div></div>
<br>_______________________________________________<br>
Rivendell-dev mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Rivendell-dev@lists.rivendellaudio.org">Rivendell-dev@lists.rivendellaudio.org</a><br>
<a href="http://caspian.paravelsystems.com/mailman/listinfo/rivendell-dev" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://caspian.paravelsystems.com/mailman/listinfo/rivendell-dev</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br></div>